Panic mode

There’s nothing like a good panic during a slow news week — or any other time if you’re in the news business.

We can take it. And a Web site, Panic Watch, can dish it out, organizing the endless “crisis” stories in one spot so that when you look at it, you realize the absurdity of it all.

On the site’s list of “bad links,” is this one:


The Power Line Task Force (PLTF), is a group of homeowners living near a power line in Minnesota. They wear special costumes with capes and have dedicated their lives to perpetuating old studies and myths about high tension lines causing childhood leukemia.

Visiting the site, we find it hasn’t been updated since June 2005, which makes one wonder if they’re OK.

(h/t: John Pearson)

  • Time for a News Cut follow-up?

    I found the “Media Panic Rankings” lists very very interesting.

    -Julia

    Interactive Producer, MPR

  • Bob Collins

    How would you rank our Minnesota crises? Aside from the Vikings’ quarterback situation, that is.

  • A crisis, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. While it isn’t pleasant to think that Minnesota could “drop from eight to seven congressional districts” I’m not so upset that I’m procreating over it.

    We seem to have our hands and minds full of universal panics like health, war, and the economy.

    But you’re right, some crises seem to be Minnesotan, like having to warn people – AGAIN – not to walk or drive on thin ice. And who knows, if the levels aren’t shrinking, that H20 might be chock-full o’ chemicals.

    How’s that for a speed drop? Not exactly a ranking. I’m open to better suggestions from the good people out there.

    -Julia

    Interactive Producer, MPR

  • dwp4401

    The Power Line Task Force is alive and well, I’m sure. They are undoubtedly gearing up for an inevitable and massive increase in membership.

    This will be the result of the realization that it will take more than 2200 miles of high-voltage power lines to accomodate the legislative mandate on renewable energy.

    Or, at least, that’s what the Public Utilities Commission reported earlier this year.