A “boomeranged” Thanksgiving?

We posted recently about how the economy is making people move home again.

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Today, the Pew Research Center offered an interesting holiday twist on the phenomenon: “Instead of traveling across country or across town, many grown sons and daughters will be coming to dinner from their old bedroom down the hall, which now doubles as their recession-era refuge.”

Pew found 13% of parents with grown children say one of their adult sons or daughters has moved back home in the past year.

That group has a name now: “boomerangers –young adults who move back home after living away. “This recession has produced a bumper crop,” Pew says. Nearly one in five parents ages 45 to 54 say they’ve been “boomeranged.”

It doesn’t have to be a problem. My MPR colleagues produced this fine video that includes the joys as well as frustrations when children move home.

Still, it’s the time of year when parents are cautioned to expect their college freshman might seem “different” when he returns home for Thanksgiving. The fact that his older brother may be living home along with his sister-in-law and nephew might make things a bit more complicated.

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Will you have children living home with you this Thanksgiving? Are you a young adult living home?

Post below or contact me directly and let me know how the living arrangements will affect Thanksgiving and other holidays. All thoughts welcome.

The Pew study reminds us how many families are affected.

This collegegrad.com survey gives you a sense of how tough it is:

Among 2009 U.S. college graduates, 80 percent moved back home with their parents after graduation, up from 77 percent in 2008. Nearly 70 percent of recent grads did not have jobs lined up when they graduated.