12 authors you should read

Kerri discussed the art of interviewing authors with John Freeman, the former editor of Granta. Here are all the books and authors mentioned during the interview and recommended by our audience:

“Little, Big” by John Crowley
“Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” by Robin Sloan
John Updike
Sarah Dessen
“The Never List” by Koethi Zan
“The End of Vandalism” by Tom Drury
“Canada” by Richard Ford
“Freedom” by Jonathan Franzen
Herta Müller
Isabel Allende
“Nickel Plated Gold” by Brian Bieber
“The March” by E.L. Doctorow

  • Clark

    D- MN trust fund baby govenor is clueless on how to create wealth. Most of us do not grow up with a money tree in our backyard.

    Put a GPS on grandpa’s phone to insure he does not reside in MN for more than 2 months. The goal is to punish people for the sin of success.

    Tax more, spend more and then tax more. Did it work in California?

    Will the obama speech police strike early today Eric?

    • Steve the Cynic

      Which is more admirable in your mind: A wealthy man who could fritter away his life in idleness but instead tries to devote his life to making some part of the world a little better for everyone? Or one who is never satisfied with enough, sees amassing wealth as an end in itself, and measures “success” in dollars?

      • JasonB

        While I agree with your point, it gives me pause: should it be considered “admirable” to lead a just life with purpose, pretty much what he should be doing like the rest of us? It’s almost like we expect rich people to be selfish jerks, and when they’re not, we’re impressed and laud them for it.

        • Steve the Cynic

          I didn’t mean to contrast Dayton with an abstract rich person, but with someone in particular: a self-confessed wealthy financial services executive named Clark.

  • Bob

    In a nutshell, he says one thing and does another. I voted for him but I don’t trust him anymore. I will not vote for him again. And I won’t vote for Tom Emmer either.

  • Gary F

    Gov. Messinger?

  • Duane

    He doesn’t instill much confidence in me. His only answer to solving a growing budget problem is to look for more places to tax. A stronger, more vigorous economy, will go much further in balancing our budget than attempting to raise the tax rate and probably slowing the growth of our economy.

  • georges

    Mark Dayton is………
    ………..the Jerry Burns of Minnesota government.

  • Bobtuse

    If the governor was a Netflix offering, he’d get 3.5
    stars. While he’s no public-speaking dynamo, the governor strikes me as thoughtful, hard-working,
    pragmatic and focused on the best interests of MN. Government needs more
    nose-to-the-grindstone problem-solvers like Mark Dayton. Pragmatic
    problem-solvers are far and away more productive than intransigent, hate-filled
    ideologues like Governor Dayton’s predecessor who was a 0 star governor.

  • GregX

    I rate him well. I disagree with his Viking stadium – but its was going to happen. I agree on his tax restructuring for MN because the existing system is based on an economic balance that no longer exists. I give him plus’s for () human rights. () progressive work on health issues ()reductions in government. () open state budget process () retention/selection of commissioners . State government, executive and judicial branches, seem stable and competent.

  • Jim G

    Governor Dayton is a refreshing example of a moderate liberal. Though I’m still waiting for tax reform and higher taxes on the wealthy, he’s shown that he’s willing to compromise, and seems to be working with the DFL legislature to make our state government work better. He’s not out to dismantle government as the Republicans would have. All you have to do is look at Wisconsin’s Governor Walker for an example of what we’d be facing now if Republican candidate, Emmer, had been elected. I trust Dayton’s judgement. So far I’d give him a “B+”, but I’m hoping for an “A” performance during this next session.

    This much is certain. He’s a much better Governor than Tim Pawlenty ever was. Pawlenty grew evermore divisive, and ended his presidential campaign as a typical my way or the highway Tea Party Republican. Governor Pawlenty submitted budgets that were dominated by shifts; borrowing from K-12 education, shorting state universities thereby shifting the costs from the state to middle class parents, and health cuts for the poor. A friend of the rich who was rewarded with a his new job: CEO of Financial Services Roundtable in Washington D.C…

    • georges

      Well, Jim, seeing you are a retired MN public school teacher, it isn’t surprising that you prefer the Dayton transfer of middle-class wealth to the public employee Union members, and their huge pensions, to the responsible governing of Scott Walker which tries to keep as much of the middle-class money in their hands and not gobbled up by the privileged government worker class.

      Pawlenty was an excellent governor, a competent bean counter. Mark Dayton, on the other hand, is a well known extremist lefty lib.

      The “over-reach” is already happening. The budget and the freedom stealing gun bills, etc., will prove it as time goes by. And the bill to make it “easier” to vote illegally before election day. Dayton could have just skipped the process and dictated that all votes are presupposed to be votes for Democrats, and will be counted as such, unless the voter goes to court to have his vote counted for someone other than a Democrat.

      Har

      • kim

        Jim G, well said. I couldn’t agree more.

        georges, the “privileged government worker class” is actually part of the middle class. They pay taxes too. They have decent pensions because they have unions to represent them in dealing with their employers. If we had more unions, we’d probably have more people earning a living wage. (And hence with more money to spend to support the economy.)

      • Gordon near Two Harbors

        Why do you live in Minnesota? Seems like Wisconsin or Mississippi would be a better fit.

  • jockamo

    Governor Goofy is a valuable employee.
    He gives us Minnesotans a much needed belly laugh on a regular basis.
    Like when he says his total reportable income is only 170K a year.
    Of course, he is a Democrat. Lying on taxes is what they do. And they are comically unaware of how badly they do it. HarHarHar

  • Ann M

    He is a poor leader. He allowed the state to shut down on 4th of July weekend–sending tourists back home. We spend millions to bring them to MN.Republicans wanted to implement a temporary fix to get us through the 4th, but he didn’t care.Precious time was wasted on a stadium. It sounds like more time will be wasted in trying to figure out the financing. If you look at the studies, MN is one of the most highly taxed states.There shouldn’t be financial problems.

  • Bear

    Unacceptable.

    In the first two years he accomplished virtually nothing, refusing to address spending problems. Now, all his proposals are tax increases. Nothing addresses spending reductions.

    Democratics need to wake up and recognize that BOTH spending and revenue must to be addressed. And, tax increases are NOT the only path to revenue increases

    Governor Dayton is staying-the-course of the uber-liberal “tax and spend” dogma. Kicking the spending-can down the road to future tax increases.

  • Gentle Snow Day

    I’m somewhat troubled by Dayton’s performance, but then he had enormous challenges to deal with in the takeover by the Tea Party Republicans. His face- down with them and resulting government shutdown left me uninspired with his leadership, but then I don’t claim to understand how to deal with ideologues either, nor just how to lead when half the dog is running the other way in a manner to destroy government itself. I’ve given him a lot of slack because of what the last governor did to us, but I’ve begun to wonder if Dayton’s biggest moves haven’t also been self-serving, as much as Pawlenty’s were to his group. The stadium deal seemed to serve the interests of Target Center as a huge payoff, and the new tax plan seems to serve the interests of the local merchant class with its internet tax. In my opinion the Humphrey Dome is good to go for 30 years of energy efficient public service, and then another 150 years with roof upkeep. But then I’m not one for tearing down what’s good and serviceable just to please an outsider monopolist. I hope Dayton can preserve our liberal Minnesota culture and even move it ahead in ways that lead the nation, but I just don’t know what he can do given the environment. I wish him well. I wish us well.

  • Carrie

    He’s doing fine. Maybe now that the DFL controls the legislature, something will actually get done. No more of the shell games.

  • Mary

    I think he’s doing a good job. He has traditional Minnesota values and follows them instead of getting “guidance” from his parties current political bent. I think he honestly puts what’s best for Minnesota first, as he should.

  • Jeff

    Dayton hasn’t accomplished much so far, other than refusing to cut state government which resulted in a government shutdown and forced the state to take out loans to be paid back in the future.

    What we have to look forward to is a Democrat run government in the next 2 years. Here are all the things we have to look forward to: a ban on all semi-automatic rifles and pistols that use clips that can hold more than 7 bullets; higher taxes on upper incomes and businesses which will be passed along to everyone through higher prices; state sales tax reform; government works projects to create “jobs”; unionization of every profession possible; hopefully the schools get paid back; legalized gay marriage; and maybe even Sunday liquor sales.

    • kevins

      I like most of the things on your list Jeff A, thanks. I believe I will look forward with a firm sense of optimism.

  • Gordon near Two Harbors

    Considering the idiots he’s had to deal with, I’d say he’s done a decent job as governor. I give him a “B”. Maybe with the radical right-wingers out of the way we can fix the structural problems with the state budget by getting rid of duplicate programs and modernizing the tax code.