Good morning and welcome to another work week. Here are some news stories to get you started.

1. A new poll of Iowa Democrats has good news for Bernie Sanders, not so good news for Hillary Clinton. (Des Moines Register)

2. Donald Trump and Ben Carson are making news in the poll of Iowa Republicans. (Des Moines Register)

3. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, once but no more an Iowa front runner, says he’s willing to consider a wall on the border — with Canada. (AP via Star Tribune)

4. Resort owners on Lake Mille Lacs are struggling now that the DNR has closed walleye season early. (MPR News)

5. Mt. McKinley will now be Denali, and some politicians from President McKinley’s home state don’t like it. (Fox News)

In a Democratic campaign cattle-call of sorts Friday one presidential hopeful pledged to work for ordinary people, another pitched his anti-establishment message and another called for more debates to counter the message from a larger Republican field.

In all, four Democratic presidential hopefuls were in Minnesota Friday trying to convince some of the most active members of their party from around the country that they, and not their rivals, deserved the party’s nomination.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley and former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee spoke to  the Democratic National Committee’s summer conference in downtown Minneapolis.

Clinton vowed to “take on problems that keep ordinary people up at night” if she’s elected president.

In her 25 minute speech Clinton tried to fire up the Democratic insiders by contrasting her positions with those of the 17 candidates who are seeking the Republican nomination.

“We Democrats are not going to sit idly by while Republicans shame and blame women. We’re not going to stay quiet while they demonize immigrants whether they’re Latino, Asian or anything else,” she said. “We’re not going to keep silent when they say climate change isn’t real or same sex couples are threatening our freedom or trickle-down economics works.”

Sanders took a veiled jab at Clinton, saying enthusiasm to elect Democrats around the country will not come with a presidential candidate who represents politics as usual.

“Given the collapse of the American middle class and given the grotesque level of income and wealth inequality we are experiencing, we do not need more establishment politics or establishment economics,” Sanders said.

Sanders said Democrats need a candidate who will take on Wall Street, fix foreign trade policies, force corporate America to invest in this country and reform the criminal justice system.

Clinton also said she would work to pass common sense gun restrictions and protect seniors on Social Security. She said she would reduce the burden of college loan debt and take steps to address heroin addiction.

O’Malley said Democrats need more pre-primary debates before they choose a 2016 presidential nominee. He said the four scheduled debates are not enough to counter the messages Republicans are putting out in their debates.

“Republicans say Americans need to work longer hours. But as Democrats we know we’re all working harder than ever and many of us are making less than before. We must raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, pay overtime pay for overtime work, and pay women equal pay for equal work to move America forward,” he said.

O’Malley has been trailing Clinton and Sanders in public opinion polls.

Lincoln Chaffee briefly raised some eyebrows when he declared he never had a scandal in 30 years of public service. It sounded like a shot at Clinton. But he later told reporters he was not trying to make that comparison.

During her speech Clinton did not mention the private email server she used as secretary of state, which has dogged her campaign for months.

She told reporters later that she is trying to do a better job explaining to the public and the media why it should not be a major issue.

As Clinton spoke to the delegates Minnesota Republican leaders were criticizing her at the State Fair.

Minnesota Republican Party Chair Keith Downey said Clinton is losing steam in public opinion polls.

“The Democrats very clearly had coalesced around one candidate, Hillary Clinton,” he said. “All of the major donors, the political infrastructure, was really aligned behind her. The growing field on the Democratic side is not because people are interested in other candidates, it’s really because Hillary Clinton is imploding before the American people.”

Democrats say they’re confident whoever wins their party’s nomination will prevail in Minnesota. The Democratic candidate for president has carried the state in every election since 1972.

MPR News reporter Tom Scheck contributed to this report.

Congratulations. You made it to Friday. Here are some news stories to read.

1. Four of the five announced candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination will be in downtown Minneapolis today to speak at the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee. (MPR News)

2. Many of those in the audience don’t think Hillary Clinton has responded well to the ongoing controversy over her private email account. (New York Times)

3.  Clinton may be trying to change the subject by comparing her Republican opponents to terrorist groups when it comes to their views on women. (CNN)

4. Donald Trump is a “huckster,” and a planned Black Lives Matter protest outside the State Fair is “inappropriate.” Those are just a couple of the things Gov. Mark Dayton said in an interview yesterday. (MPR News)

5. And finally, with fewer kids growing up on farms these days some of the animals at the State Fair are leased, not owned. (MPR News)

Have a great weekend.